Site: Mike Hulme

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Recent Articles

Mike Hulme: Calculating the Incalculable: Is SAI the Lesser of Two Evils?

In a forthcoming article in Ethics and International Affairs, Christopher J. Preston uses the doctrine of double effect to claim that hypothetical climate engineers might very well be less culpable for climate harms than those who continue to emit greenhouse gases.  In an invited response for the journal, I claim that his argument is unpersuasive.

2017-10-12 09:26   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Prospective PhD Students

I am interested to receive approaches from students who would like to study for a PhD with me in the areas of the cultural history of climate change, STS approaches to studying climate science and knowledge, representations and discourses of climate in the media, and the philosophy of climate and climate change.  Please state clearly your

2017-10-12 03:03   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Previous PhD Students

I have acted as primary supervisor for 15 PhD students, all of whom have successfully completed their doctorates.  I have also been external or internal examiner for a further 24 PhD theses, in the UK, Australia, Canada and the Netherlands. Chaya Vaddhanaphuti (2017): Experiencing and performing in the field: how do Northern Thai farmers make

2017-09-16 15:40   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Climate Change and the Syrian Civil War Revisited

This peer-reviewed journal article, coauthored with colleagues Jan Selby (University of Sussex), Omar Dahi (Hampshire College, USA) and Christiane Frohlich (University of Hamburg), is now published in the journal Political Geography.  The abstract reads: “For proponents of the view that anthropogenic climate change will become a ‘threat multiplier’ for instability in the decades ahead,…

2017-09-07 08:00   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Beyond Counting Climate Consensus

This peer-reviewed essay, written with colleagues from the University of Nottingham, has just been published in the journal Environmental Communication, together with an associated press release.  The abstract reads: “Several studies have been using quantified consensus within climate science as an argument to foster climate policy. Recent efforts to communicate such scientific consensus…

2017-07-25 04:39   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Climate Change and the Significance of Religion

Published in today’s issue of Economic & Political Weekly in India, this Essay argues that there is a growing sense that religion has a part to play in shaping our responses to climate change. Merely understanding climate science, or dealing with it through the frame of technology is clearly insufficient. Religious engagement with climate change

2017-07-15 08:42   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: On the ethics of fossil fuel divestment – a response to Willis Jenkins

A student of history and journalism from the University of Montana recently wrote to me about climate change and fossil fuel divestment (FFD).  She had read and studied my arguments against FFD and claimed to appreciate the different sides of the argument.  But this unsettled her and she felt disoriented.  “What should she do”, she

2017-07-07 08:36   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: WIREs Climate Change – rising impact factor

The new journal impact factors for 2016 announced last week show the growing citation success of the journal which I edit, WIREs Climate Change.   Our Thomson-Reuters JIF for 2016 was 4.57, the highest we have been since the journal launched in 2010.  The new Elsevier CiteScore, calculated in a slightly different way to the

2017-06-17 11:20   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Latest articles in WIREs Climate Change

WIREs Climate Change: Latest issue Vol.8(4). The latest issue of WIREs Climate Change is now available on-line.  The 9 review articles in this issue include Paulo Ceppi and colleagues on cloud feedback mechanisms in climate models, Colette Mortreux & Jon Barnett on what we understand by ‘adaptive capacity’ and Sam Randalls on the contribution of geography

2017-06-17 11:00   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Previous PhD Students

I have previously acted as primary supervisor for these 15 PhD students, all of whom have successfully completed their doctorates.  I have also been external or internal examiner for a further 23 PhD theses, in the UK, Australia, Canada and the Netherlands. Chaya Vaddhanaphuti (2017): Experiencing and performing in the field: how do Northern Thai farmers

2017-06-16 15:40   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: One Man Does Not Control the Climate

It is important not to over-react to the news that Donald Trump wishes to withdraw the USA from the Paris Agreement and seek to renegotiate a ‘fairer deal’ for America. The wailing and grieving around the media that has accompanied yesterday’s announcement is exactly the sort of reaction that Trump is seeking to provoke. It

2017-06-02 13:08   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Energy Humanities Podcast

Listen to me talking about ‘the many meanings of climate’ (starts at 10:00 minutes), recorded with Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer for their Cultures of Energy blog, part of the Centre for Energy and Environmental Research in the Human Sciences at Rice University, Houston.

2017-05-16 13:50   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Major Publications 2016

Hulme,M. (2016)  ‘Climate change and memory’   Chapter 18 (pp.159-162) in: Memory in the twenty-first century: new critical perspectives from the sciences, arts and humanities  (ed.) Sebastian Groes,  Palgrave Macmillan, London, 428pp. Hulme,M. (2016)  ‘Climate change: Varieties of religious engagement’   Chapter 25 (pp.239-248) in: Routledge handbook on religion and ecology …

2017-03-20 20:32   Click to comment

Mike Hulme: Political populism and sustainability

The first response of a scientist or scholar to surprising physical or cultural events is to want to understand them.  And in this spirit, my reaction to the political events of 2016, and potentially to those yet to come, is to seek understanding.  By constructing an explanation for unsettling events, the world seems again a

2017-03-17 18:00   Click to comment


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